DIGITAL CINEMA

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14 Majors to Explore 14 Majors to Explore 14 Majors to Explore

The program does not stress one particular genre or style, but allows students to pursue their own interests which have included: narrative, experimental, animation, and documentary.

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The Digital Cinema major at NMU

The School of Art and Design's B.F.A. in Digital Cinema offers you the opportunity to take up to 24 credit hours of digital cinema courses. The B.A. and B.S. have a possible 16 hours in digital cinema with the option of a minor.

Each course contains several levels of the digital cinema experience ranging from history to production. The major emphasis in the upper level courses is on the individual production of digital cinema with each student expected to demonstrate his/her proficiency in the many skills involved as opposed to learning only one aspect of production, such as editing, cinemaphotography, or even animation. The program does not stress one particular genre or style, but allows students to pursue their own interests which have ranged from animation to the documentary.

All projects within the studio are produced in digital video with facilities and equipment that include the following: high definition and 4K digital video cameras, seven nonlinear multiple processor Mac Pro workstations and 18 editing stations with Final Cut Pro, fluid head tripods and lighting and sound equipment. Studios are available for screenings, animation and sound production, and are open for student use with supervision over 80 hours a week. In addition, students are using their MacBook Pro to edit video or prepare components to composite video in the lab.

Course expenditures vary from semester to semester depending upon the length and complexity of a project a student wishes to investigate. Usually the minimum cost expected for supplies and textbooks averages from $100-150 per semester. Upper level students are required to purchase a digital video camera for their own use, similar to photography students who acquire still cameras.

Recent graduates are currently employed in many facets of digital cinema making, including commercial animation, feature film and television production, Web site developers (digital cinema majors have skills from required graphic communication and computer art classes), medical audio-visual production, digital cinema distribution, education institutions and self-employed studio artists.

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The Digital Cinema Majors Utilize Multiple Video Formats to Explore Many Types of Communication

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Digital Cinema Studio

Digital Cinema Students utilize the shared Art & Design Computer Studio. The studio has four labs, one designed for laptop use, and the other three are equipped with Apple MacPro computers, 23" flat screen displays, Wacom drawing tablets, and scanners. Software includes Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Premiere, Adobe After Effects, and Apple Final Cut Pro, and many others. The facility provides digital video cameras, tripods, lighting equipment, and microphones for overnight checkout. Network storage is available for moving projects from one workstation to another and as temporary backup storage. Digital Cinema students also have access to the greenscreen lighting studio, outfitted with a Knioflow light system and upperclassman access to the Red Scarlet camera. The studio is open approximately 80 hours outside of class times for student use. In addition, the Digital Cinema program utilizes a state of the art theatre style classrom for both lecture, screenings, and critique of student work.

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New Red Scarlet Camera
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4K Editing Suite
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Green Screen Studio
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Screening Room
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The Digital Cinema Studio is Equipped with a Wide Range of Software and High End Workstations

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Digital Cinema Faculty

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Gabrielle McNally

Assistant Professor
BA Luther College
MFA Univeristy of Iowa

A practicing artist, Gabrielle McNally works in experimental autobiographical and essayistic nonfiction exploring the notions of documentation, family history, genealogy, inherited memory, place, fragmentation, ritual, and performance. Gabrielle executes all aspects of her works including the conception, cinematography, editing, sound design, and musical composition. Gabrielle graduated with an MFA in Film and Video Production in 2014 from University of Iowa. In her time at Iowa, she also completed certification in Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies. Gabrielle collaborated on feature films in Iowa before attending graduate school. She received her B.A. in with honors in art from Luther College in Decorah, Iowa in 2009 focusing her work on video, performance, and installation. She also studied vocal music performance, theatre, and dance, participating extensively in all three. She continues to include these techniques in her video work. Her personal work has screened internationally at several film festivals and galleries.


EMAIL

gmcnally@nmu.edu

WEBSITE

gabriellemcnally.com
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Gabrielle McNally
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Gabrielle McNally
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Gabrielle McNally
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Daric Christian

Professor
BFA Savannah College of Art & Design
MFA Ohio University

Daric Christian has navigated between many mediums throughout his career. Based on a specific social concept to communicate, the medium which facilitates that communication best is utilized. This approaches caters to his love of research and technology, which has allowed Daric to work in both commercial and fine art approaches. He received degrees in Photography and utilizing the photo imaging making skill set branched into video installation art and interactive design. Professor Christian has taught classes in both the Digital Cinema and the Computer Art programs at Northern Michigan University and views teaching as his primary concern, truly enjoying working with students and witnessing the students growth in their chosen mediums. Recently, Daric has been focused on animation, and narrative video. However, he still produces commercial interactive web design in his free time, when he is not out riding his bikes on the Upper Peninsula trails.


EMAIL

dachrist@nmu.edu
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Daric Christian
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Daric Christian
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Digital Cinema Courses

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AD 112 Digital Cinema: Introduction

Offered: Fall, Winter
4 credit hours

Introduction to the physical aspects of digital video production. Screenings emphasize narrative features and shorts. Equipment is provided.


AD 212 Digital Cinema: Experimental and Documenatry Narratives

Offered: Winter
4 credit hours
Prerequisites: AD 112 or instructors permission

Continued development of digital video production skills and knowledge emphasizing experimental and documentary narrative video production. Equipment is provided.


AD 312 Digital Cinema: Animation Forms

Offered: Winter
4 credit hours
Prerequisites: AD 212 or AD134 or instructors permission

Continued development of digital video production skills and knowledge emphasizing animation forms. Equipment is provided.


AD 412 Digital Cinema: Seminar

Offered: Fall
4 credit hours
Prerequisite: AD303, AD 312 and junior standing or instructor's permission

Continued development of digital video production skills and knowledge emphasizing a seminar project. Students must have access to a video camera.


AD 458 Digital Cinema: BFA Seminar

Offered: Fall, Winter
4 credit hours
Prerequisites: AD303, AD 412 and junior standing or instructor's permission

Development of a portfolio presentation and an ideological statement.

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Digital Cinema FAQ

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What is the difference between a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Cinema and a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science?

The BFA is considered the professional studio degree, as it has more credits in the Digital Cinema concentration and more specific requirements in studio, such as Graphic Communication and Computer Art. The BFA also has more art history requirements and does not allow a minor. The BA and BS degrees provide students with the option to pursue a minor such as a major in Digital Cinema and a minor in Music (20 credit hours). The BA also has a language requirement.

Does the school require a portfolio review before you are accepted into our programs?

If you are accepted into the university you are able to pursue a degree within the school. However, you can present a portfolio to the professor in your studio area who will use your work to gauge whether you should receive advanced placement credit (replaces course and credit hours) or a waiver (replaces course but not the credit hours) or at what studio level you should begin. This portfolio can be reviewed during a campus visit or with a faculty member during an office hour during the semester. Although there is no required portfolio review to enter the program, Art and Design majors must participate and complete a faculty review of their portfolios (Individual Art Review AD 303) is scheduled the twelfth week of each semester.

Are there scholarships for incoming Art and Design majors at the Freshman level?

The school offers the High School Freshman Scholarship (four $1000 awards) that is available each year with applications due in April.

Scholarship Information

What equipment is required for Digital Cinema majors??

For the first two studio courses, AD 112: Introduction and AD 212: Expermental & Documentry Narratives, all equipment is provided including video cameras, tripods and lighting kits. The fourth course in the concentration AD 412: Seminar, requires all majors to own a digital-video camera with features that include manual focus and aperture control. Students are encouraged to discuss their potential camera purchase with Digital Cinema course instructors, who will review the specifications to determine if they will meet the requirements of the course projects. All Art and Design majors are provided with an Apple MacBook and Adobe Premiere & After Effects software that will allow students to edit video on their laptop. However, many Digital Cinema majors have also purchased Final Cut Pro to utilize software that is available in the Art & Design Computer Studio.

What are the prospects for employment with a degree in Digital Cinema?

Although Digital Cinema is a very competitive field, the employment outlook is very optimistic. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics the number of jobs in the U.S. motion picture and video industries increased by over 100,000 jobs from 1994 to 2004. The bureau estimates that the number will grow by 31 percent in the next eight years. According to the Chicago Tribune, “that is roughly double the 16 percent growth projected by the bureau for other U.S. industries in the same time....these are jobs primarily with the major U.S. studios and smaller independent motion picture companies; the statistics do not include jobs with companies that make documentary and industrial films and videos, and those that create visual material for computer games, cell phones and other new media”. Requirements for the BFA degree in Digital Cinema include Graphic Communication, Photography and 12 credit hours in Computer Art. These requirements expand the professional skills and knowledge of Digital Cinema graduates, who are currently employed in a range of occupations that include television producers, independent filmmakers and Internet animators.

What emphasis will I find in the Digital Cinema program?

The Digital Cinema program presents a curriculum that exposes students to a broad experience that includes preproduction (storyboarding, scriptwriting, art direction), production (directing, videography, animation) and postproduction (editing, sound production, DVD design and distribution). Although technical competency is required, the emphasis of all projects is to develop understandable concepts with the original intention realized in the final video production. Each studio course has a video production and cinema history component that presents the chronological development of a cinematic genre and its relationship to the current student project.

AD 112 emphasizes narrative cinema including commercials, shorts and feature films. AD 212 presents various documentary approaches and experimental narrative approaches. AD 312 presents traditional animation using digital tools and is illustrated with examples of animation film history and genres. AD 412 features contemporary genres, independent and international cinema. AD 458 BFA Seminar, includes a review of classic American and world cinema. The program stresses no single philosophical approach or cinematic genre, but allows students to pursue their own interests in the senior and BFA courses.

Do most of your majors find employment?

The majority of students that continue to pursue work in Digital Cinema find employment in the video industry, both broadcast and web formats. The internet has opened up many more production jobs and our graduates are experienced editors and cinematographers well suited for small production houses. Graduates are currently working throughout the United States from Oregon to Rhode Island. The opportunity for internships in Marquette, MI are limited, so students are encouraged to use summer as an opportunity to research companies and even complete internships which increase their chances of employment upon graduation. Advanced courses include a component of resume and portfolio development so students are prepared the day they graduate (sometimes earlier) to begin a job search. A number of our graduates choose to pursue graduate studies.

May I enroll in other Art and Design classes?

Yes - there are Art and Design elective credits designed into the curriculum. You should consult with your advisor for specific details. All 100-level Art and Design studio classes have no pre-requisites and can be taken by anyone.

More Questions?
Please write Professor Daric Christian dachrist@nmu.edu
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